New Books for Summer

We have so many amazing new books (and beautiful covers) this month! I’m including more than usual and I STILL couldn’t include them all. You’re going to have to stop by and check them out yourself. (See what I did there 🙂 )

What We’re Reading: Meal

Three figures hold cooking implements surrounded by meal worms.
Get it? Meal

Title: Meal

Author: Blue Delliquanti with Soleil Ho

Format: Graphic Novel

Genre: Fiction

Why did you choose to read this book?

The cover drew me to it at first. I like food and I like books about food and the images of the characters looked fun. Then, once I realized it was about eating bugs I was even more fascinated. 

Continue Reading →

Library hosts fourth annual Student Art Exhibition

The library is excited to host our fourth annual Student Art Exhibition which features wonderful art works by our talented Associate in Fine Arts students. Paintings, ceramics, sculpture, and drawings are presented. The art will be on display through May 2nd. Enjoy photos of some of the art works in the exhibition below.  An opening reception with refreshments will be held on Wed. Apr. 24 from 4:00-6:00 pm in Library Room 212 to celebrate the artists. 

Fresh Finds at the OCC

Pollen dust cloud got you down? Try these pollen-free* new reads in their freshly wrapped dust jackets. 

*No guarantees once they leave the library. It’s brutal out there, y’all. 

Celebrate Poetry Month with Durham Tech

April is National Poetry Month, which celebrates and encourages people to read and rediscover poets and poetry in their literary lives. 

National Poetry Month, April 2019. "And then our singing
Brought on a different manner of weather
We took new stock of one another
We wept to be reminded of such color."  from "An Old Story" by Tracy K. Smith.

How can you participate at Durham Tech? Good news! We’ve got a few easy suggestions! 

Want some more poetry in your life? Check out local public libraries and independent bookstores for more events. 

Dance as Cultural Reflection and Influence

If you’ve walked by the entrance to the library this week you may have seen our new dance themed window display. Books about dance or that feature dance, both non-fiction and fiction, academic texts to children’s books. Complete with dance shoes and a poster advertising the upcoming Dancing the African Diaspora event with Dr. DeFrantz.

Dr. Thomas DeFrantz is a professor at Duke University teaching African American Studies, Dance, and Women’s Studies. He’ll be coming to share his knowledge as both a scholar and performer with all of us. See the full event description below!

Dancing the African Diaspora Event at 2 PM on April 9th in the multipurpose room.

Dancing the African Diaspora: Black American Social Dances

Black music and dance provide the creative engine for a global system of expressive culture. For example, we find hip hop, voguing, jazz dance, and swing dance practiced all over the planet by eager groups of social dancers, many of whom have little daily connection to African American people.

This talk explores the terms of encounter that have created the spaces of Black Social Dance. Moving outward from a consideration of African American-derived systems of embodied knowledge, the talk constructs historical and theoretical models to allow for a deeper understanding of how Black social dances come to be, what they do in the world, and how they hold enormous and continuous currency of motion as an urgent site of embodied expression that speaks to an increasingly diverse global populace.

Come join in! Exploring historical modes of Black Social Dance, we will dance together as well!

This event is sponsored by Viva the Arts.

Carolina Asia Center Funds New Library Material

We have a bunch of awesome new materials for check out thanks to the Carolina Asia Center at UNC. Funded by their Title VI grant from the Department of Education, the Carolina Asian Center fosters Asian studies on campus by supporting instruction, collaborating on cultural events, and working with faculty interested in adding Asian content to their courses.

Continue Reading →

North Carolina GlaxoSmithKline Foundation Endows Dr. Phail Wynn Jr. Library Collection

The North Carolina GlaxoSmithKline Foundation has awarded $50,000 to the Durham Technical Community College Foundation to create the Dr. Phail Wynn, Jr. Library Endowment. 

Dr. Phail Wynn, Jr. served as president of Durham Tech for 27 years. Upon his retirement in 2007, he established The Dr. Phail Wynn, Jr. Collection at the Durham Tech Library. Dr. Wynn generously supported the collection through personal philanthropy until his passing in July 2018. The library is very proud of Dr. Wynn’s collection and we are thrilled that that we can sustain and grow it in the years to come to honor his memory and legacy.  When students ask about the special collection it is a wonderful opportunity to tell them about our inspirational former president and his commitment to education, passion for service, dedication to the community, and his vision for the future.

photo of Dr. Wynn
Dr. Phail Wynn Jr., President,
Durham Technical Community College
1980-2007

Dr. Wynn’s collection promotes cultural awareness, tolerance, diversity, environmental conservation, sustainability, and peace. The collection is located on the upper level of the library.  Here are some new titles recently added to the collection.  Visit our display window at the entrance to the library and ask a staff member if you would like to borrow any of the materials on display.

What We’re Reading: The Feather Thief

The Feather Thief: Beauty, Obsession, and the Natural History Heist of the Century by Kirk Wallace Johnson

This book was read by Meredith Lewis, the [mostly] Orange County Campus Librarian, and is available for checkout at the Orange County Campus Library.

Title: The Feather Thief: Beauty, Obsession, and the Natural History Heist of the Century 
Author: Kirk Wallace Johnson

Genre: Social Science, True Crime [against a museum and the historical record], History [of animal specimen collection and feather fashion], Ethics

#ReadGreatThings2019 Category: A social science book; A book by a person you admire; A book that features college or higher education

Check out our blog post on the Read Great Things 2019 Challenge


Why did you choose this book? 

I read a lot of book lists and this one popped up sometime last year. Plot-wise, I like museums and true crime, and a museum heist was immediately something interesting to me. I don’t fly fish, but you don’t need to in order to enjoy this book.

Really, The Feather Thief is kind of about a lot of things– recovering after personal and professional disappointment, Victorian fly fishing lures, the role of museums and museum specimens in the historical record and preservation, the ecologically destructive power of fashion, and what can happen to an insular community when something illegal impacts them.  At its core, it’s about a young man who, realizing he has an opportunity to make some money in a niche community that he is a member of, breaks into a natural history museum, steals a lot of rare bird carcasses, and then sells the feathers. He gets caught (not really a spoiler). A portion of the fly fishing community reacts (or refuses to acknowledge their participation). People justify the bad behavior as not so bad and ignore the parts that don’t impact them directly. Reflection ensues. 

Did it remind you of any other book or a movie? 

It reminded me a little of Bad Blood by John Carreyrou (available through the OCC Library) and there’s this movie on Amazon Prime I watched a while ago about a man who forges (copies?) famous paintings and then donates them to art museums called Art & Craft. Both of them examine how people justify or try to hide behaviors that are bad or ethically just not right, but in different ways. I guess that’s a topic that interests me. Who knew? 

Who would you recommend this book to? 

Anyone ready to be surprised by an engaging nonfiction book that may not perfectly align with their own interests. Anyone looking to fill their social science checkbox in the Read Great Things 2019 Challenge. People who like true crime, but want to avoid the murdery ones. 

Also, people who like to tie their own fly fishing lures. This book talks your talk, unless you’re sensitive about buying authentic feathers for Victorian-era lures– then you may feel exceptionally called out.