What We’re Reading (& New in the OCC Library): From Here to Eternity

from here to eternity by caitlin doughty book cover

Available at the OCC Library on the New Book Shelf

Title: From Here to Eternity: Traveling the World to Find the Good Death
Author: Caitlin Doughty
Genre: Nonfiction — Essay & Travelogue

Why did you choose to read this book?

I saw it as a nominee for the Goodreads Choice Awards best nonfiction book of 2017 and it seemed interesting– I read both Mary Roach’s Spook and Stiff a few years ago and found the topic of how we as a culture think about death and the afterlife really interesting then, too. This book talks more about cultural practices and beliefs about death and bodies and is a light and engaging read (for real!).

Was there anything noteworthy about the book?

They highlighted a natural burial ground in North Carolina! I thought that was pretty cool.

Who would you recommend the book to?

Anyone interested in learning more about the topic of burial itself, but in a “morbid lite” kind of way. Also anyone interested in diverse cultural practices and beliefs– the book looks at countries from around the world (hence the travelogue part of the genre description).


Additional books mentioned in this post (because yay! books!)–

Spook: Science Tackles the Afterlife by Mary Roach is available at the Main Campus Library in the downstairs stacks (call number BL 535 .R63 2006).

Stiff: The Curious Lives of Human Cadavers by Mary Roach is available at the Orange County Campus Library on the New Books shelf (call number R 853 .H8 R635 2004).

New DVDs and Books

New DVDs

We have some great new DVDs in our collection! These and others can be checked out for one week at a time.

 

New Books

These items can be checked out for three weeks at a time.

 

New Books!

Take a look! We have added a lot of new fiction, literature, and poetry as well as non-fiction titles on many other topics. We invite you to browse these titles and check them out! To check for item availability and call number location, use the Durham Tech library catalog.

New Reference Books!

These items can be used in the library but not taken out.

New Circulating Books!

These items can be checked out for three weeks at a time.

 

New Books!

I think that there are few things more wonderful than new books, but I acknowledge that, being a librarian, I’m biased. See a full list of the gems recently added to our collection in this PDF: New Books.

Highlights from the full list include:

Cover of "Ivory, Horn, and Blood" shows a rhino with armed guards nearby and a group of elephants walking.Ivory, Horn, and Blood: Behind the Elephant and Rhinoceros Poaching Crisis by Ronald Orenstein

This alarming book tells a crime story that takes place thousands of miles away, in countries that few of us may visit. But like the trade in illegal drugs, the traffic in elephant ivory and rhinoceros horn has far-reaching implications not only for these endangered animals, but also for the human victims of a world-wide surge in organized crime, corruption and violence.

 

A white creature with tentacles against a black background.The Last Animal: Stories by Abby Geni

This is a series of stories unified around one theme: people who use the interface between the human and the natural world to contend with their modern challenges in love, loss, and family life. These are vibrant, weighty stories that herald the arrival of a young writer of surprising feeling and depth.

 

A landscape with vegetation.Looking Out, Looking In: Anthology of Latino Poetry. William Luis, editor.

This twelfth edition continues its outstanding tradition of combining current information with a fun, reader-friendly voice that links course topics to your everyday life.

 

 

The title fades to gray into the background: "No Place to Hide"No Place to Hide: Edward Snowden, the NSA, and the U.S. Surveillance State by Glenn Greenwald

In May 2013, Glenn Greenwald set out for Hong Kong to meet an anonymous source who claimed to have astonishing evidence of pervasive government spying and insisted on communicating only through heavily encrypted channels. That source turned out to be the 29-year-old NSA contractor Edward Snowden, and his revelations about the agency’s widespread, systemic overreach proved to be some of the most explosive and consequential news in recent history, triggering a fierce debate over national security and information privacy.

Awesome New Books!

Even though all of our new books are exciting, below are just some of the books recently added to the Durham Tech library collection. Check them out! More new books are noted in a new books list.

 

Cover shows a Nigerian girl standing against a blank dark backgroundA Bit of Difference by Sefi Atta

At thirty-nine, Deola Bello, a Nigerian expatriate in London, is dissatisfied with being single and working overseas. She works as a financial reviewer for an international charity. When her job takes her back to Nigeria in time for her father’s five-year memorial service, she finds herself turning her scrutiny inward. In Nigeria, Deola encounters changes in her family, the urban landscape of her home, and new acquaintances who offer unexpected possibilities. Deola’s journey is as much about evading others’ expectations to get to the heart of her frustration as it is about exposing the differences between foreign images of Africa and the realities of contemporary Nigerian life.

 

Cover shows a red fist punching the airDiaries of an Unfinished Revolution: Voices from Tunis to Damascus by Layla Al-Zubaidi, Matthew Cassel, Naomi Craven Roderick, editors

With unrest in so many areas of the world right now, this may be a timely book for reflection. Focusing on the revolution that swept through the Arab world in spring of 2011, the book brings together testimony from people who were on the ground at the time. These essays and profoundly moving, often harrowing, firsthand accounts span the region from Tunisia to Syria and include contributors ranging from student activists to seasoned journalists—half of whom are women. This unique collection explores just how deeply politics can be held within the personal and highlights the power of writing in a time of revolution.

 

Yellow text against a blue background. Text says, "Do it anyway"Do It Anyway: The Next Generation of Activists by Courtney E. Martin

If you care about social change but hate feel-good platitudes, Do It Anyway is the book for you. Courtney Martin’s rich profiles of the new generation of activists dig deep, to ask the questions that really matter: How do you create a meaningful life? Can one person even begin to make a difference in our hugely complex, globalized world?

 

The black silhouette of a city against a white background. Images of Mao and the title says, "From Moon Cakes to Mao to Modern China."From Moon Cakes to Mao to Modern China: An Introduction to Chinese Civilization by Zhu Fayuan, Wu Qixing, Xia Hanning, Gao Han

To understand China, we need to step into the palace of her culture and explore her rich history. With this in mind, a group of scholars from China and America have put this book together as a kind of primer on all things China, from art and science to religion and society. They have tried to offer here a panoramic view of the totality of Chinese culture, using only the most representative material, to introduce to the West the most typical aspects of Chinese civilization and life.

 

Smoke rising from the site of a nuclear disasterFukushima: The Story of a Nuclear Disaster by David Lochbaum, Edwin Lyman, Susan Q. Stranahan, and the Union of Concerned Scientists

In the first definitive account of the Fukushima disaster, two leading experts from the Union of Concerned Scientists, David Lochbaum and Edwin Lyman, team up with journalist Susan Q. Stranahan, the lead reporter of the Philadelphia Inquirer’s Pulitzer Prize–winning coverage of the Three Mile Island accident, to tell this harrowing story. Fukushima combines a fast-paced, riveting account of the tsunami and the nuclear emergency it created with an explanation of the science and technology behind the meltdown as it unfolded in real time. Bolstered by photographs, explanatory diagrams, and a comprehensive glossary, the narrative also extends to other severe nuclear accidents to address both the terrifying question of whether it could happen elsewhere and how such a crisis can be averted in the future.

 

Photographs highlighting social issues line the left side. White text on blue background says, "How Serious Is Teen Drunk and Distracted Driving?"How Serious Is Teen Drunk and Distracted Driving? (In Controversy series) by Patricia D. Netzley

This series is very good if you’re writing a pros and cons paper or thinking about a debate! This particular book examines the controversy surrounding the issue of dangerous driving, including how cell phones impact teen driving habits and whether teen drivers are more susceptible to distractions than adult drivers.

 

 

 

New Fiction! Hooray!

Did you know that the library has a nice fiction collection?

We purchase new novels, graphic novels, books of poetry, and short story collections a few times per year using funds from our Durham Tech Foundation Campus Fund Drive account.  We think that pleasure reading is important and fun!  We also appreciate hearing your requests.  If you have a book to recommend to the library for our collection, please let us know in the comments below or send us an email (library@durhamtech.edu).

Check out our current display downstairs for the month of September for our new arrivals.

Photograph of a book display featuring fiction books

You can also search for titles in the online catalog if you have a favorite author or series that you enjoy reading.

Here are some of the new titles:

Among Others by Jo Walton

Astray by Emma Donoghue

Blasphemy: New and Selected Stories by Sherman Alexie

Eleanor and Park by Rainbow Rowell

Fire in the Streets by Kekla Magoon

Have You Seen Marie? by Sandra Cisneros

The Humanity Project by Jean Thompson

Kings and Queens of Roam by Daniel Wallace

Mary Coin by Marisa Silver

The Moon and More by Sarah Dessen

The Silver Star by Jeannette Walls

The Twelve Tribes of Hattie by Ayana Mathis

The Unreal and the Real: Selected Stories Volumes 1 & 2 by Ursula Le Guin

Vampires in the Lemon Grove by Karen Russell

The Weird: A Compendium of Strange and Dark Stories by Ann VanderMeer

Where’d You Go, Bernadette by Maria Semple

Curl up with a new book and enjoy!

Read the book and watch the movie

Books often translate well to film.  Here are some of the titles that the library has as both book and DVD.

Red collage with the picture of a film reel and the phrases "From Books to Film," "Read the book," and "Watch the movie."

Visit our display on the lower level for these titles.

  • Anna Karenina
  • Diary of Anne Frank
  • Eclipse
  • Emma
  • For Colored Girls
  • Freakonomics
  • Freedom Writers
  • The Hours
  • A Lesson Before Dying
  • Life of Pi
  • Lord of the Rings
  • Moneyball
  • The Namesake
  • No Country for Old Men
  • A Raisin in the Sun
  • The Road
  • Sense & Sensibility
  • Snow Flower and the Secret Fan
  • Water for Elephants

Recently adapted books-to-film coming soon: Cloud Atlas and Great Gatsby

Get growing with great gardening resources

Check out the library’s display of gardening resources downstairs on the lower level for ideas and inspiration:

Green text says, "Gardening Resources." Images below of a tomato, peppers, and carrots. Brown text below that says, "Get Growing!" A gardening spade is at the very bottom.

  •  American grown : the story of the White House kitchen garden and gardens across America  
  • The vegetable gardener’s container bible : how to grow a bounty of food in pots, tubs, and other containers
  • The ultimate guide to growing your own food : save money, live better, and enjoy life with food from your own garden
  • From seed to skillet : a guide to growing, tending, harvesting, and cooking up fresh, healthful food to share with people you love
  • Reclaiming our food : how the grassroots food movement is changing the way we eat
  • Grow great grub : organic food from small spaces
  • Basic gardening skills
  • The new American homestead : sustainable, self-sufficient living in the country or in the city
  • Organic manifesto : how organic farming can heal our planet, feed the world, and keep us safe
  • Growing it here, growing it now [videorecording]
  • The garden [videorecording]

Search the online catalog for more titles. Recommended gardening blogs and websites:

Attention, graduates! Career resources are available for you in the library and online!

Career Resources poster in orange, red, and blue with the text, "Career Resources" "Resumes and Cover Letters" "Are you graduating this spring? Are you in the market for a job?" "Interview Skills" "Career Guidebooks"

Take a look at our Career Resources LibGuide for lots of good materials and links.

Did you know that DTCC has an online Career Center?

New print resources in the library:

  • Job Interviews for Dummies
    Call Number: HF 5549.5 .I6 K393 2012
  • The Essential Phone Interview Handbook
    Call Number: HF 5549.5 .I6 B295 2011
  • Resume 101
    Call Number: HF 5383 .S3275 2012
  • Hot Health Care Careers
    Call Number: R 690 .H68 2011
  • Job Searching with Social Media for Dummies
    Call Number: HF 5382.7 .W35 2011

Bridging Cultures Bookshelf: Muslim Journeys

Photograph of the main campus library display window showing materials from the Muslim Journeys

Library Display Window

The Durham Tech Library was recently awarded a National Endowment for the Humanities grant called Bridging Cultures Bookshelf:  Muslim Journeys.

The grant provides our library with more than 25 books and videos about Muslim culture, history, literature, and faith.  Visit the  Durham Tech events calendar for details about programs, films, and book discussions related to Muslim culture and faith that will occur throughout the year.

Please see the muslimjourneysposter for more information about campus events.

Use the online catalog to locate these materials in the library.

Three Muslim art medallions. Books

  • Minaret by Leila Aboulela
  • A Quiet Revolution by Leila Ahmed
  • The Conference of the Birds by Farid al-Din Attar, translated by Dick Davis and Afkham Darbandi
  • The House of Wisdom: How Arabic Science Saved Ancient Knowledge and Gave Us the Renaissance by Jim Al-Khalili
  • Prince Among Slaves by Terry Alford
  • Islamic Arts by Jonathan Bloom and Sheila Blair
  • Muhammad: A Very Short Introduction by Jonathan A. C. Brown
  • The Columbia Sourcebook of Muslims in the United States, edited by Edward E. Curtis IV
  • In an Antique Land by Amitav Ghosh
  • When Asia Was the World: Traveling Merchants, Scholars, Warriors, and Monks Who Created the “Riches of the East” by Stewart Gordon
  • Leo Africanus by Amin Maalouf, translated by Peter Sluglett
  • The Arabian Nights (anonymous), edited by Muhsin Mahdi, translated by Husain Haddawy
  • In the Country of Men by Hisham Matar
  • The Story of the Qur’an: Its History and Place in Muslim Life by Ingrid Mattson
  • The Ornament of the World by Maria Rosa Menocal
  • Dreams of Trespass by Fatima Mernissi
  • Rumi: Poet and Mystic, edited and translated by Reynold A. Nicholson
  • Snow by Orhan Pamuk, translated by Maureen Freely
  • Acts of Faith by Eboo Patel
  • The Children of Abraham: Judaism, Christianity, Islam by F. E. Peters
  • The Art of Hajj by Venetia Porter
  • House of Stone by Anthony Shadid
  • Persepolis: The Story of a Childhood by Marjane Satrapi
  • Broken Verses by Kamila Shamsie
  • The Butterfly Mosque: A Young American Woman’s Journey to Love and Islam by G. Willow Wilson

Films

  • Prince Among Slaves
  • Islamic Art: Mirror of the Invisible World
  • Koran by Heart

The Bridging Cultures Bookshelf: Muslim Journeys is a project of the National Endowment for the Humanities, conducted in cooperation with the American Library Association. Support was provided by a grant from Carnegie Corporation of New York. Additional support for the arts and media components was provided by the Doris Duke Foundation for Islamic Art.