2022 Durham Tech Library Poetry Month Bookmarks!

2-sided bookmarks with image on one side and poem on other side. Poems are  "Characteristics of Life" by Camille T. Dungy, "Small Kindnesses" by Danusha Laméris, "Rain" by Raymond Carver, "for grandma" by NC Poet Laureate Jackie Shelton Green, and "I Pick Up My Footprints" by Vasyl Holoborodko, translated from Ukrainian by Svetlana Lavochkina, illustrated by our own Reference Librarian Sasha Deyneka, adapted from the works of Maria Prymachenko
Click on the image to go to the 2022 Durham Tech Library Poetry Bookmark pdf file.

This year’s poetry month bookmarks have “Characteristics of Life” by Camille T. Dungy, “Small Kindnesses” by Danusha Laméris, “Rain” by Raymond Carver, “for grandma” by NC Poet Laureate Jackie Shelton Green, and “I Pick Up My Footprints” by Vasyl Holoborodko, translated from Ukrainian by Svetlana Lavochkina, illustrated by our own Reference Librarian Sasha Deyneka, adapted from the works of Maria Prymachenko.

The file is a pdf, so you can print your own (and color them in, if that’s your thing). Print 2-sided, short edge. Cardstock is recommended.

Bookmarks and bookmark sheets will be available for pick up at the Main Campus Library by Thursday (we’re having some technical difficulties with the copier) and are currently available at the Orange County Campus Library.

Click through to download Durham Tech Library Poetry Month bookmarks from 2021, 2019, and 2017, which include poems from Amanda Gorman, Terrance Hayes, Mary Oliver, Kay Ryan, Danez Smith, Rita Dove, Ellen Bass, and many more!

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New Poetry for National Poetry Month, April 2022

This poster was designed by eleventh grader Lara L. from Saunders Trades and Technical High School in Yonkers, New York, who was the winner of the 2022 National Poetry Month Poster Contest, and features a line by 2021 Presidential Inaugural Poet and 2017 National Youth Poet Laureate Amanda Gorman.

This poster was designed by eleventh grader Lara L. from Saunders Trades and Technical High School in Yonkers, New York, who was the winner of the 2022 National Poetry Month Poster Contest, and features a line by 2021 Presidential Inaugural Poet and 2017 National Youth Poet Laureate Amanda Gorman.


To celebrate Poetry Month, the Durham Tech Library and Student Engagement Departments are thrilled to announce the return of the Poetry Fox!

poetry fox at typewriter in main campus library

Join us Tuesday, April 26 from 11:30-1:30 p.m. outside of the Main Campus Library (ERC, Building 5) to get a custom poem written on the spot by The Poetry Fox! (If the weather gets weird, this event will move into the Main Campus Library in the downstairs collaborative study area.)

One word for a custom poem on his typewriter!

This event is for students, faculty, and staff.


Main Campus Library has many new poetry anthologies, poet biographies and memoirs, and books about poetry for you to enjoy. Keep reading for a selection of some of our new titles.

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2021 Durham Tech Library Poetry Month Bookmarks!

Thanks to everyone who sent me your favorite poem! 

This year’s poetry month bookmarks contain some nature poems, some poems about peeking at other people’s houses (consensually), an ode to James Baldwin, and several more. 

screenshots of the bookmark images to accompany 2021's poems

Click through to download previous years’ and 2021’s Durham Tech Library Poetry Month bookmarks, which include Joy Harjo’s “Ah, Ah,” Danez Smith’s “little prayer,” Kay Ryan’s “Sharks’ Teeth,” Stanley Kunitz’s “Halley’s Comet,” Rita Dove’s “My Mother Enters the Work Force,” Karl Shapiro’s “The Living Rooms of My Neighbors,” an excerpt from Amanda Gorman’s “In This Place (An American Lyric),” Ellen Bass’s “The Thing Is,” Terrance Hayes’s “[Seven of the ten things I love in the face],” and David Whyte’s “Horses Moving on the Snow.”

The file is a pdf, so you can print your own (and color them in, if that’s your thing). 

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April is Poetry Month!

April is National Poetry Month!

National Poetry Month, April 2021. Celebrating 25 years. The 2021 poster was designed by twelfth grader Bao Lu from Edward R. Murrow High School in Brooklyn, New York, who was the winner of the 2021 National Poetry Month Poster Contest, and features lines by U.S. Poet Laureate Joy Harjo. "There is nowhere else I want to be but here. I lean into the rhythm of your heart to see where it will take us." Image is an impressionistic painting of a young man floating (or falling) over the telephone lines of a three or four lane road with houses lining the sides. A red-orange-pink ball hovers below his left foot. A yellow hand on a crossing sign is illuminated. The colors are vibrant on a wash of black, white, gray, and tans that make up the scene.

Last year, we did a blackout poetry Crafternoon, and this year we’d like to ask you:

Who is your favorite poet?

What’s your favorite poem?

Let me (Meredith Lewis) know by 5:00 this Friday, April 16 either via email (lewisma@durhamtech.edu) or Teams chat for a chance to have you favorite poem made into this year’s Durham Tech Library Poetry Month bookmarks.

(I’m going to tell you a secret: If you send me a poem or poet that you’d just think would make a good bookmark, I won’t hold it against you and no one is fact-checking what “favorite” means in this context. A short to mid-length poem with vivid imagery is ideal.)

Click through to see previous Durham Tech Library Poetry Month bookmarks and print your own (which are designed to be colored in if you so desire). 

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Celebrate National Poetry Month with poems of hope and solace

Image of tree with pieces of wood hanging that features the following line from the poem "Remember" by current U.S. Poet Laureate, Joy Harjo: “Remember all is in motion, is growing, is you.”
The official April 2020 National Poetry Month poster features the artwork of Samantha Aikman, winner of this year’s National Poetry Month Poster Contest for Students

Here are three short poems to read and reflect on during this uncertain and challenging time.  

blessing the boats by Lucille Clifton – 1936-2010

(at St. Mary’s)

may the tide
that is entering even now
the lip of our understanding
carry you out
beyond the face of fear
may you kiss
the wind then turn from it
certain that it will
love your back may you
open your eyes to water
water waving forever
and may you in your innocence
sail through this to that

From Quilting: Poems 1987-1990 by Lucille Clifton. Copyright © 2001 by Lucille Clifton. 

Spring Morning by Marion Strobel

O day—if I could cup my hands and drink of you,
And make this shining wonder be
A part of me!
O day! O day!
You lift and sway your colors on the sky
Till I am crushed with beauty. Why is there
More of reeling sunlit air
Than I can breathe? Why is there sound
In silence? Why is a singing wound
About each hour?
And perfume when there is no flower?
O day! O Day! How may I press
Nearer to loveliness?

This poem is in the public domain. Published in Poem-a-Day on March 22, 2020, by the Academy of American Poets.

Everyone Sang by Siegfried Sassoon – 1886-1967

Everyone suddenly burst out singing;
And I was filled with such delight
As prisoned birds must find in freedom
Winging wildly across the white
Orchards and dark green fields; on; on; and out of sight.

Everyone’s voice was suddenly lifted,
And beauty came like the setting sun.
My heart was shaken with tears and horror
Drifted away … O but every one
Was a bird; and the song was wordless; the singing will never be done.

This poem is in the public domain.

Looking for more poetry?

A wonderful resource for poetry is Poets.org.  You can sign up for a free poem-a-day in your inbox and discover amazing poets and poems from around the world. 

Another great resource is Poetry Foundation. Their website feature an audio poem each day and has topical poetry collections such as
U.S. Latinx Voices in Poetry,  Asian American Voices in Poetry, 
Poems of Anxiety and Uncertainty, Poetry and Food, poems for children and teens, and helpful poem guides.