About Courtney Bippley

Courtney is a Reference Librarian at the Main Campus Library. Her favorite genres are fantasy and science fiction. She loves dogs, coffee, and dancing.

Coming to A Screen Near You: 2019 Book-to-Film Adaptations

There are a plethora of book adaptations coming out this year. Here are 5 books you can take home today and their upcoming screen counterparts.

Be that “the book was better” person!

If Beale Street Could Talk by James Baldwin

In this honest and stunning novel, James Baldwin has given America a moving story of love in the face of injustice. Told through the eyes of Tish, a nineteen-year-old girl, in love with Fonny, a young sculptor who is the father of her child, Baldwin’s story mixes the sweet and the sad. Tish and Fonny have pledged to get married, but Fonny is falsely accused of a terrible crime and imprisoned. Their families set out to clear his name, and as they face an uncertain future, the young lovers experience a kaleidoscope of emotions-affection, despair, and hope. In a love story that evokes the blues, where passion and sadness are inevitably intertwined, Baldwin has created two characters so alive and profoundly realized that they are unforgettably ingrained in the American psyche. –Goodreads.com

Pet Sematary by Stephen King

When the Creeds move into a beautiful old house in rural Maine, it all seems too good to be true: physician father, beautiful wife, charming little daughter, adorable infant son—and now an idyllic home. As a family, they’ve got it all…right down to the friendly cat.

But the nearby woods hide a blood-chilling truth—more terrifying than death itself…and hideously more powerful. –Goodreads.com

Where'd You Go, Bernadette? By Maria Semple

Bernadette Fox has vanished.

When her daughter Bee claims a family trip to Antarctica as a reward for perfect grades, Bernadette, a fiercely intelligent shut-in, throws herself into preparations for the trip. But worn down by years of trying to live the Seattle life she never wanted, Ms. Fox is on the brink of a meltdown. And after a school fundraiser goes disastrously awry at her hands, she disappears, leaving her family to pick up the pieces–which is exactly what Bee does, weaving together an elaborate web of emails, invoices, and school memos that reveals a secret past Bernadette has been hiding for decades. –Goodreads.com

The Best of Enemies: Race and Redemption in the New South by Osha Gray Davidson

C. P. Ellis grew up in the poor white section of Durham, North Carolina, and as a young man joined the Ku Klux Klan. Ann Atwater, a single mother from the poor black part of town, quit her job as a household domestic to join the civil rights fight. During the 1960s, as the country struggled with the explosive issue of race, Atwater and Ellis met on opposite sides of the public school integration issue. Their encounters were charged with hatred and suspicion. In an amazing set of transformations, however, each of them came to see how the other had been exploited by the South’s rigid power structure, and they forged a friendship that flourished against a backdrop of unrelenting bigotry. –Goodreads.com

Good Omens: The Nice and Accurate Prophecies of Agnes Nutter, Witch by Terry Pratchett andNeil Gaiman

According to The Nice and Accurate Prophecies of Agnes NutterWitch (the world’s only completely accurate book of prophecies, written in 1655, before she exploded), the world will end on a Saturday. Next Saturday, in fact. Just before dinner.

So the armies of Good and Evil are amassing, Atlantis is rising, frogs are falling, tempers are flaring. Everything appears to be going according to Divine Plan. Except a somewhat fussy angel and a fast-living demon—both of whom have lived amongst Earth’s mortals since The Beginning and have grown rather fond of the lifestyle—are not actually looking forward to the coming Rapture.

And someone seems to have misplaced the Antichrist . . . –Goodreads.com

What We’re Reading – There Is No Good Card For This

There is no good card for this: What to say and do when life is scary, awful, and unfair to the people you love

Title: There Is No Good Card For This: What To Say And Do When Life Is Scary, Awful, And Unfair To People You Love

Authors: Kelsey Crowe and Emily McDowell

When someone you know is hurting, you want to let her know that you care. But many people don’t know what words to use—or are afraid of saying or doing the wrong thing. This thoughtful, instructive guide, from empathy expert Dr. Kelsey Crowe and greeting card maverick Emily McDowell, blends well-researched, actionable advice with the no-nonsense humor and the signature illustration style of McDowell’s immensely popular Empathy Cards, to help you feel confident in connecting with anyone experiencing grief, loss, illness, or any other difficult situation. –Goodreads.com

Why did you choose to read this book?

In the past year I have seen people I love and care about lose people they love and care about five times. Each time I felt helpless in the face of their loss, unable to think of anything I could say or do that would make the person feel even incrementally better. I was also afraid of saying something wrong and somehow making them feel worse than they already did. This state of uncertainty and powerlessness made me feel like a bad friend/daughter/coworker and I didn’t like it.

So, as I tend to do, I found a book to apply to the problem. And this book delivered.

What did you like about it?

I liked that this book actually did what it set out to do since I was skeptical when I picked it up. It comforted me while explaining how to best be comforting to others. There are helpful tips on various situations with background on why these things are helpful. They have a ton of examples and it’s written very conversationally with lots of graphics so it never feels overwhelming. They also have the book laid out in such a way that you can skip directly to the Just Help Me Not Be A Disaster section to find concrete dos and don’ts when talking to someone going through a crisis. All this and the book managed to sprinkle in some funny bits as well!

What feeling did the book leave you with?

I finished this book feeling more confident about my ability to support someone. And, a clearer idea of what I’m willing to do to support them. There are a variety of available support roles to someone going through a hard time and I was able to identify the roles I feel like I would be best at filling. The book also left me feeling like I will be able help my friends and family in the future with more grace than I have in the past.

Who would you recommend the book to?

Everyone. Unless you’re some kind of interpersonal relationship savant, then maybe you could skip it. But, really, the holidays are coming up and chances are we all know someone who had something bad happen to them in the past year. What do you say? Do you mention it? Do you say the stock “I’m sorry” and leave it at that? Would even bringing it up make things awkward? Will they think you don’t care if you don’t bring it up? What if they are the ones who bring it up? This book can help you figure out the answers to what to say in each situation and that is valuable for both you and the person you’re talking to.

What would you pair this book with?

This book would go well with a good hug and a hearty casserole of your choice.

New DVDs in the Library

Now that the weather outside is frightful, it’s time to stay inside and watch movies! Check out some of our new DVD titles.

What We’re Reading-Starless

 

An image of multiple stars falling at night over a dark landscape.Let your mind be like the eye of the hawk…Destined from birth to serve as protector of the princess Zariya, Khai is trained in the arts of killing and stealth by a warrior sect in the deep desert; yet there is one profound truth that has been withheld from him.

In the court of the Sun-Blessed, Khai must learn to navigate deadly intrigue and his own conflicted identity…but in the far reaches of the western seas, the dark god Miasmus is rising, intent on nothing less than wholesale destruction.

If Khai is to keep his soul’s twin Zariya alive, their only hope lies with an unlikely crew of prophecy-seekers on a journey that will take them farther beneath the starless skies than anyone can imagine.

Goodreads

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Crash Course in Media Literacy

Media literacy is a topic that comes up often these days. But, what does it actually mean? What counts as media? What does it entail? How can we teach students the skills needed to digest media critically?

There is a Crash Course for that!

Click through the embedded video below or find the full playlist here.

Crash Course is a YouTube channel that was started by John Green and his brother Hank Green. (Yes, it’s that John Green.) These educational videos are free to watch, though if you are inspired to donate to their patreon it is appreciated. The videos span topics from history to science to economics. And, now they’ve added media literacy! The host of the media literacy videos is Jay Smooth. He guides viewers through twelve videos on media literacy past, present, and future. If you’re looking for just the skills portion skip to video number eleven, but all of them are worth watching. You can show these videos in class, embed them in your Sakai site, or even just mention them to students who are looking for some clarification when working toward understanding media.

Visit the Durham Tech Library’s Evaluating News Sources libguide for more resources on media and information literacy.

Fall Into New Books

Girl reading a book by candlelight with a hot drink and a pumpkin and cookies.

Gif by Tumblr user @ Pati Cmak.

As we enter the season of reading by the fire with fuzzy socks and pumpkin spice lattes (my favorite season) here are some excellent choices of books to get cozy with while watching the leaves fall.

Fall Into A New Book

Before you head off campus today come grab a book to read over the long weekend. These are some of our new titles you can take home!

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