About Courtney Bippley

Courtney is a Reference Librarian at the Main Campus Library. Her favorite genres are fantasy and science fiction. She loves dogs, coffee, and dancing.

New and Free Books!

It’s July! That means it is time for pie, unbearable heat, and a fresh crop of books to read!

Bonus: we’re giving away FREE BOOKS in the library right now. They are on a cart next to the entrance. We’re adding new ones all the time so even if you stopped by before, come check again.

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Picture (Book) Perfect

Did you know that the Durham Tech Library has a whole collection of children’s picture books? Well, we do!

They are located against the wall on the lower level of the library. 

Books shelves with really cute picture books.
Look at all those cute books!

We have classics, awards winners, and freshly published titles for you check out. My personal favorites are the ones with dragons in them. Dragons are great.

Come by and check some out. I bet someone wants you to read to them!

Little girl holding out a book saying "pretty please."
From tenor.com.

New Books for Summer

We have so many amazing new books (and beautiful covers) this month! I’m including more than usual and I STILL couldn’t include them all. You’re going to have to stop by and check them out yourself. (See what I did there 🙂 )

What We’re Reading: Meal

Three figures hold cooking implements surrounded by meal worms.
Get it? Meal

Title: Meal

Author: Blue Delliquanti with Soleil Ho

Format: Graphic Novel

Genre: Fiction

Why did you choose to read this book?

The cover drew me to it at first. I like food and I like books about food and the images of the characters looked fun. Then, once I realized it was about eating bugs I was even more fascinated. 

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Dance as Cultural Reflection and Influence

If you’ve walked by the entrance to the library this week you may have seen our new dance themed window display. Books about dance or that feature dance, both non-fiction and fiction, academic texts to children’s books. Complete with dance shoes and a poster advertising the upcoming Dancing the African Diaspora event with Dr. DeFrantz.

Dr. Thomas DeFrantz is a professor at Duke University teaching African American Studies, Dance, and Women’s Studies. He’ll be coming to share his knowledge as both a scholar and performer with all of us. See the full event description below!

Dancing the African Diaspora Event at 2 PM on April 9th in the multipurpose room.

Dancing the African Diaspora: Black American Social Dances

Black music and dance provide the creative engine for a global system of expressive culture. For example, we find hip hop, voguing, jazz dance, and swing dance practiced all over the planet by eager groups of social dancers, many of whom have little daily connection to African American people.

This talk explores the terms of encounter that have created the spaces of Black Social Dance. Moving outward from a consideration of African American-derived systems of embodied knowledge, the talk constructs historical and theoretical models to allow for a deeper understanding of how Black social dances come to be, what they do in the world, and how they hold enormous and continuous currency of motion as an urgent site of embodied expression that speaks to an increasingly diverse global populace.

Come join in! Exploring historical modes of Black Social Dance, we will dance together as well!

This event is sponsored by Viva the Arts.

Carolina Asia Center Funds New Library Material

We have a bunch of awesome new materials for check out thanks to the Carolina Asia Center at UNC. Funded by their Title VI grant from the Department of Education, the Carolina Asian Center fosters Asian studies on campus by supporting instruction, collaborating on cultural events, and working with faculty interested in adding Asian content to their courses.

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Coming to A Screen Near You: 2019 Book-to-Film Adaptations

There are a plethora of book adaptations coming out this year. Here are 5 books you can take home today and their upcoming screen counterparts.

Be that “the book was better” person!

If Beale Street Could Talk by James Baldwin

In this honest and stunning novel, James Baldwin has given America a moving story of love in the face of injustice. Told through the eyes of Tish, a nineteen-year-old girl, in love with Fonny, a young sculptor who is the father of her child, Baldwin’s story mixes the sweet and the sad. Tish and Fonny have pledged to get married, but Fonny is falsely accused of a terrible crime and imprisoned. Their families set out to clear his name, and as they face an uncertain future, the young lovers experience a kaleidoscope of emotions-affection, despair, and hope. In a love story that evokes the blues, where passion and sadness are inevitably intertwined, Baldwin has created two characters so alive and profoundly realized that they are unforgettably ingrained in the American psyche. –Goodreads.com

Pet Sematary by Stephen King

When the Creeds move into a beautiful old house in rural Maine, it all seems too good to be true: physician father, beautiful wife, charming little daughter, adorable infant son—and now an idyllic home. As a family, they’ve got it all…right down to the friendly cat.

But the nearby woods hide a blood-chilling truth—more terrifying than death itself…and hideously more powerful. –Goodreads.com

Where'd You Go, Bernadette? By Maria Semple

Bernadette Fox has vanished.

When her daughter Bee claims a family trip to Antarctica as a reward for perfect grades, Bernadette, a fiercely intelligent shut-in, throws herself into preparations for the trip. But worn down by years of trying to live the Seattle life she never wanted, Ms. Fox is on the brink of a meltdown. And after a school fundraiser goes disastrously awry at her hands, she disappears, leaving her family to pick up the pieces–which is exactly what Bee does, weaving together an elaborate web of emails, invoices, and school memos that reveals a secret past Bernadette has been hiding for decades. –Goodreads.com

The Best of Enemies: Race and Redemption in the New South by Osha Gray Davidson

C. P. Ellis grew up in the poor white section of Durham, North Carolina, and as a young man joined the Ku Klux Klan. Ann Atwater, a single mother from the poor black part of town, quit her job as a household domestic to join the civil rights fight. During the 1960s, as the country struggled with the explosive issue of race, Atwater and Ellis met on opposite sides of the public school integration issue. Their encounters were charged with hatred and suspicion. In an amazing set of transformations, however, each of them came to see how the other had been exploited by the South’s rigid power structure, and they forged a friendship that flourished against a backdrop of unrelenting bigotry. –Goodreads.com

Good Omens: The Nice and Accurate Prophecies of Agnes Nutter, Witch by Terry Pratchett andNeil Gaiman

According to The Nice and Accurate Prophecies of Agnes NutterWitch (the world’s only completely accurate book of prophecies, written in 1655, before she exploded), the world will end on a Saturday. Next Saturday, in fact. Just before dinner.

So the armies of Good and Evil are amassing, Atlantis is rising, frogs are falling, tempers are flaring. Everything appears to be going according to Divine Plan. Except a somewhat fussy angel and a fast-living demon—both of whom have lived amongst Earth’s mortals since The Beginning and have grown rather fond of the lifestyle—are not actually looking forward to the coming Rapture.

And someone seems to have misplaced the Antichrist . . . –Goodreads.com